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Noticias y nuevos records de IGFA

 

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 FEBRERO 2014

  

IGFA Hot Catches

 

New Freshwater and Species World Record Opportunities

 

In a monumental move that will create hundreds of vacancies – and new opportunities – for world records, the IGFA has announced two upcoming changes to its record categories that will go into effect April 1, 2014: Freshwater line class and fly rod records will now be separated into men’s and women’s categories, and European perch and Florida pompano will now be eligible for line class, fly rod, and All-Tackle Length records.

 

The IGFA Expands Freshwater Record Program

 

Unlike those kept for saltwater species, IGFA line class and fly rod records kept for freshwater species have never before been separated into men’s and women’s categories. When the new change takes place on April 1, 2014, all current freshwater line class and tippet class records will be appropriately placed in their respective categories, based on the angler’s gender. Retired records will not be reinstated when separating the records, but rather, vacancies will fill the voids created. Catches made prior to this date will not be eligible for the new record categories. 

 

“This change will make world records more equitable across the saltwater and freshwater communities,” IGFA World Records Coordinator Jack Vitek has said, “and it will be exciting to see which vacancies are filled first.”

 

New Species Added – European Perch and Florida Pompano

 

While the IGFA keeps All-Tackle records for just about any species that swims, only certain species are eligible for the line class, fly rod, Junior Angler, and All-Tackle Length record categories. These species typically have a large range and are generally considered popular game fish in the eyes of the international angling community. The IGFA’s Records Department keeps a running list of species that have received requests to be added to this group. When sufficient demand is received for a certain species, it is considered for addition to the list of species eligible for the additional record categories mentioned above.

 

The European perch (Perca fluviatilis) and the Florida pompano (Trachinotus carolinus) have received a considerable number of requests. Geographically, the European perch occurs throughout Eurasia and is extremely popular among the freshwater angling community. The Florida pompano has long been a favorite of both boat and shore bound anglers fishing in the Atlantic Ocean - from central Brazil to the eastern seaboard of the USA, throughout the Gulf of Mexico and in scattered locations in the Caribbean Sea.

 

Record categories for these two species will also open on April 1, 2014, and just like the new women’s freshwater categories, catches made prior to this date will not be eligible for record consideration.

 

For questions about the new changes, contact IGFA World Records Coordinator Jack Vitek at jvitek@igfa.org or 954-927-2628.

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Founded in 1939, the IGFA is a non-profit organized under Section 501(c)(3) under the Internal Revenue Code and is  best known for conservation efforts of fisheries, educational programs, rule-making and for maintaining worldwide game fish records in freshwater, saltwater, fly fishing and junior angler categories. IGFA members are located in over 125 countries. The IGFA welcomes visitors to its 60,000-square-foot interactive Fishing Hall of Fame & Museum in Dania Beach, Florida.

 

For further information, contact the IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame & Museum, 300 Gulf Stream Way, Dania Beach, Florida 33004; phone 954-927-2628, fax: 954-924-4299, website: www.igfa.org.

 

 

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February 5, 2014

 

 

Fly anglers have been putting in some record-class fishing effort recently – this month’s IGFA Hot Catches highlights of potential new world records feature three catches all caught on fly rods. Check out the two peacock bass and the arawana caught in Brazil, Colombia, and Guyana, all contending for World Record titles.

 

Meanwhile, the saltwater world is abuzz with news of a potential new All-Tackle record Pacific bluefin tuna caught off the coast of New Zealand. The Cook Islands, Panama, and Key West and Louisiana in the United States have also produced several potential new World Records, including black and red drum, a black grouper, mullet snapper, and giant trevally. Read on for the latest updates from the IGFA World Records department!

 

 

 

Freshwater

 

Venezuelan angler Eduardo Aristeguieta traveled to Mataven, Colombia where he caught an impressive 8.16 kg (18 lb 0 oz) speckled peacock (Cichla temensis) while fly fishing on December 4, 2013. Aristeguieta hooked the trophy peacock on a green hornet fly and needed nearly 10 minutes to subdue the fish on 4 kg (8 lb) tippet. With the current record in this tippet class standing at 7.4 kg (16 lb 5 oz), Aristeguieta’s fish could earn him a new world record.

 

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Richard Hart recently submitted the first All-Tackle Length application for Orinoco peacock (Cichla orinocensis), with a 35 cm specimen he caught on January 21st while fly fishing Brazil’s Aqua Boa River. Hart needed five minutes to boat the fish after it ate the baitfish pattern he was throwing. The current IGFA record is vacant.

 

IGFA Representative Peter Binaski of Huntington Beach, California traveled to Guyana at the end of 2013 to target some of the exotic freshwater species found in the remote South American jungles. Binaski was not disappointed, as he caught am 84 cm potential All-Tackle Length record arawana (Osteoglossum bicirrhosum) on November 17th while fly fishing on the Essequibo River. After coming tight on the fish, Binaski needed 10 minutes to subdue the trophy arawana, which was released alive after being properly documented. The current IGFA record stands at 67 cm.

 

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Saltwater

 

Kiwi angler Kevin Baker potentially set the new All-Tackle record for Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis), with a 352.5 kg (777 lb 1 oz) fish he caught on September 14, 2013 while fishing off the coast of Greymouth, New Zealand. This massive tuna hit during the final hours of Baker’s multiple day fishing trip aboard the Cova Rose, captained by Lance Goodhew. After marking fish on the sounder, Baker fed a fresh hoki back through the chum line and almost instantly came tight on the big fish. With the trip nearly at its end, Baker was pressed for time and was forced to put serious tension on the fish – at times bumping the drag on his Shimano 130W up to 37 kg (80 lb) during the intense 30 minute fight. Baker and the crew were prepared to tag the fish as they had with several previous catches, but once it was boat side the decision was made to take the fish as it was the biggest specimen any of them had ever seen. Tipping the scales at 352.5 kg (777 lb 1 oz), Baker’s fish surpasses the existing record by nearly 20 kg (40 lb).

 

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Australian angler Paul Worsteling caught and released an impressive giant trevally (Caranx ignobilis) on January 8th while casting a popper along the beautiful reefs surrounding the Cook Islands in the Indian Ocean. After the GT crushed Worsteling’s popper, the experienced angler needed 10 minutes to boat the fish. Taping out to 109 cm on the IGFA’s Official Measuring Device, Worsteling’s fish exceeds the existing All-Tackle Length record by 2 cm and could potentially earn him the new record.

 

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While on a holiday trip to the Key West from her home in New Jersey, angler Brielle Bennett landed a 7.25 kg (16 lb 0 oz) black grouper (Mycteroperca bonaci) on November 24, 2013 that could potentially earn her the new female Junior record. Bennett was fishing with a live grunt when the grouper engulfed her bait and headed for the bottom. The young angler was able to turn the grouper and bring it to the boat where it was quickly weighed, documented, and then released alive. The existing record stands at 6.12 kg (13 lb 8 oz).

 

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Over the holidays, angler Kyle Vincent traveled from his home in Florida to Panama, where he took advantage of the world class fishing available through Tropic Star Lodge in Piñas Bay. While fishing with Capt. Epifano Candelo aboard Miss Australia on December 27, 2013, Vincent landed a 12.6 kg (27 lb 12 oz) mullet snapper (Lutjanus aratus) while slow trolling a live bonito.  Ten minutes after hooking up, Vincent had the fish in the boat and the potential new men’s 10 kg (20 lb) line class record. The existing record stands at 7.9 kg (17 lb 8 oz).

 

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Robert Cunningham Jr., who holds multiple IGFA records, recently submitted a potential men’s 2 kg (4 lb) tippet class record for a 14.97 kg (33 lb 0 oz) red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) he caught and released while fishing the marshes of southern Louisiana, USA. Cunningham enticed the redfish to bite with a well-presented fly – tied by his guide Bo Meador Jr. – and skillfully played the fish for 30 minutes. Once subdued, the fish was carefully weighed and documented before it was released alive. The current IGFA record is 13.15 kg (29 lb 0 oz).

 

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Japanese angler Ikuko Sakagawa landed the potential new women’s 10 kg (20 lb) tippet class record for black drum (Pogonia cromis) on October 28, 2013, while fishing out of New Orleans, Louisiana, USA with local guide Tristan Daire. Sakagawa, a skilled fly angler, needed 10 minutes to boat the fish after it ate the fly she was casting. Sakagawa’s quality drum weighed in at 15.6 kg (34 lb 6 oz) – less than a pound heavier than the existing claim. 

 

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IGFA HOT NEWS

January 2014

 

The new year has brought more new World Record applications to the International Game Fish Association. Catches made in Brazil, Italy, and Suriname for common carp, speckled peacock, and trahira are now being reviewed by the IGFA to verify that they were made in accordance with International Angling Rules. If so, the freshwater world will have three new World Records– all of which were released to be caught again another day.

 

Anglers have been busy in the Bahamas, Cuba, Japan, and California, Hawaii, and Louisiana in the United States! The IGFA is currently reviewing World Record applications from those locations for California halibut, kelp bass, Japanese seabass (suzuki), redfish, and sharpjaw bonefish, and has approved new Inshore Super Grand and Offshore Grand Slams. Read on for details!

 

FRESHWATER

 

While fishing with guide Martin Beenes on Suriname’s South River on October 30th, angler Olivier Charpentier landed an impressive trahira (Holias spp.) that crushed a Sebile lure he was casting. After hooking up to the fish, Charpentier needed five minutes to land the prehistoric looking fish that measured out to 97 cm. Once the fish was measured and photographed, it was released alive – qualifying Charpentier for the potential new All-Tackle Length record, which currently stands at 94 cm.

 

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Brazilian angler Rogerio Luis Araujo landed a trophy speckled peacock (Cichla temensis) on November 20th while fishing with local guide Orland Carneira in Brazil’s Cuiuni River. Araujo needed 20 minutes to subdue the fish after it inhaled the popper he was casting along the shoreline. Once landed, the fish measured out to 91 cm before it was released alive. With the existing All-Tackle Length record at 88 cm, Araujo’s fish would replace the current record if approved.

 

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Italian angler Ana Maria Gura landed a 30.15 kg (66 lb 7 oz) common carp (Cyprinus carpio) on July 5th while fishing in Ghostpark Lake, Itay. Gura’s massive carp was caught on a boilie and put up a 20 minute fight on 10 kg (20 lb) tackle before it was released alive. If approved, Gura’s carp would replace the existing record by nearly 5 kg (10 lb).

 

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SALTWATER

 

Japanese angler Mari Kitagawa landed a potential women’s 8 kg (16 lb) tippet class record Japanese seabass (suzuki) (Lateolabrax japonicus) on November 20th while fishing with local guide Ryuhei Masuda around Honmoku, Japan. Kitagawa needed only two minutes to land the 3.4 kg (7 lb 7 oz) fish after it ate a well-placed streamer fly, and was released alive after being properly documented. The current IGFA record is 2.3 kg (5 lb 1 oz).

 

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Texas native Meredith McCord recently traveled to the neighboring state of Louisiana in the United States to target world record class redfish that congregate around the coastal city of Venice. Armed with nothing more than a fly rod and the knowledge of local guide Al Keller, McCord hooked an impressive 14.97 kg (33 lb 0 oz) red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) on December 1st – a catch that could potentially earn her the new women’s 10 kg (20 lb) tippet class record. McCord needed 15 minutes to subdue the fish after it ate a custom Keller’s Redfish Killer fly. Once landed, the fish was quickly documented and released alive. The current IGFA record stands at 13.38 kg (29 lb 8 oz).  

 

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Angler Michael Moore landed a 25.5 kg (56 lb 4 oz) California halibut (Paralichthys californicus) on November 2nd while fishing off Santa Cruz Island in his home state of California, USA. Moore needed 20 minutes to land the fish after it ate the squid he was soaking. With the existing record at 24.17 kg (53 lb 4 oz), Moore’s fish could potentially earn him the new men’s 10 kg (20 lb) line class record.  


Junior angler Jamie Hamamoto of Honolulu, Hawaii, landed what could become the new All-Tackle world record for sharpjaw bonefish (Albula virgata) while fishing with her father, Wade Hamamoto, from Hawaii’s North Shore on October 11th. Hamamoto was fishing with scad when she hooked a 2.49 kg (5 lb 8 oz) bonefish that put up a tough five minute fight. The current IGFA record is 2.27 kg (5 lb 0 oz).

 

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While fishing with his father, Ty Ponder, on November 24th, angler T.J. Ponder landed a 2.92 kg (6 lb 7 oz) kelp bass (Paralabrax clathratus) off the coast of San Clemente Island in his home state of California, USA. Ponder was casting a MC Swimbait when the fish hit, and needed less than a minute to subdue this potential Male Junior record fish, which was released alive. The current IGFA record stands at 2.6 kg (5 lb 11 oz).

 

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SLAMS

 

Christmas came early for Canadian angler Pierre Manseau, who accomplished the prestigious Inshore Super Grand Slam on December 24, 2013 while fly fishing in Cayo Largo, Cuba with local guide Rigoberto. Manseau’s bonefish, snook and tarpon were all quality fish – but his permit, estimated at 7 kg (15 lbs), was extremely impressive, and all of his catches were released to be caught again another day. Congratulations, Pierre, on a great achievement!

 

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Nicholas McNew is the newest member of the IGFA’s Offshore Grand Slam club, after returning to his home in Mississippi, from a fish-filled vacation in the Bahamas with his family. The young McNew landed a dolphinfish, wahoo and yellowfin tuna on December 27th while trolling the fertile waters off the Abacos.

 

 

 

Two potential world record musky were recently caught and released in the St. Lawrence River by two separate anglers, only two days apart. Michael Forjohn, of Ambier, Pennsylvania, landed an enormous 130 cm muskellunge (Esox masquinongy) on December 2nd, while trolling a Swim Wizz lure in the St. Lawrence River, near Clayton, New York. Once hooked up, Forjohn needed only six minutes to subdue his trophy, which he quickly measured, photographed and released alive. If approved, Forjohn’s catch would best the existing All-Tackle Length record by 2 cm, although it may not be on the books for long.

 

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Two days later, on December 4th, Mark Carlson of Rockford, Illinois, hooked into a massive 132 cm musky (estimated at 55 lb) that put up a brutal 15 minute fight after it crushed the Legend Perch lure he was trolling on the St. Lawrence. Carlson, the current IGFA All-Tackle Length record holder for musky, immediately realized his catch was of record quality and quickly measured, photographed, and released the fish alive. The potential record catch was also equipped with a tag before it was released, as Carlson actively participates in a Quebec fisheries study. 

 

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Freshwater anglers in Canada, Finland, the Netherlands, and New Mexico in the United States have reason to get out and fish this month (although we never really need much reason beyond water being nearby) – potential new world records for Arctic char, brook trout, muskellunge, northern pike, and zander have recently been caught in these regions, and four of the five were released to be caught again another day!

 

In saltwater news, a trip to Ascension Bay, Mexico has produced an Inshore Super Grand Slam (catching a bonefish, tarpon, snook, and permit all in the same day) for an Italian angler – a feat that’s been accomplished less than 100 times in the IGFA’s record book. New world records are also pending review for golden trevally, grey snapper, red drum, red snapper, and wahoo caught in Australia, Tonga, and in Louisiana, Florida, and the Gulf of Mexico off the coasts of the United States. Read on for more details!

 

Freshwater

 

Finnish angler Jasmin Vataja landed an impressive 6.04 kg (13 lb 5 oz) zander (Sander lucioperca) on October 21st while fishing with local guide Kari Hokkanen in Airisto, Finland. Vataja was trolling a Rapala plug when the fish hit, and needed 20 minutes to subdue the potential 8 kg (16 lb) line class record. The current IGFA record is 3.64 kg (8 lb 8 oz).

 

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James Schmid, of Fort Collins, Colorado, USA, caught a potential new All-Tackle Length record Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) on August 15th while fishing the Nanook River in Nunavut, Canada. Schmid was casting a pink bunny fly when he came tight on a beautifully colored 88 cm char that took him close to 10 minutes to land.  After some quick photos and measurements were taken, Schmid released the fish alive. The current IGFA record is 86 cm.

 

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German angler Stephan Gockel landed a potential new All-Tackle Length record northern pike (Esox lucius) on October 1st while fishing around Nimwegan in the Netherlands. Gockel was casting a Rooster V-Tail lure when he hooked into the 120 cm pike that put up a tough 10 minute battle. Once subdued, the fish was quickly measured, photographed and released alive. If approved, Gockel’s pike would beat the existing record by 2 cm.

 

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While fishing Bluewater Lake, in his home state of New Mexico, USA, angler Thomas W. Murphey caught an 8.33 kg (18 lb 5 oz) tiger muskellunge (Esox masquinongy x Esox lucius) on October 27th, which could potentially earn him the new 4 kg (8 lb) tippet class record. Murphey needed 10 minutes to land the toothy fish after it nailed the clouser fly he was casting from his kayak. Prepared with a sling and certified scale, Murphey was able to release the fish alive after all the proper documentation. The current IGFA record is 5.02 kg (11 lb 1 oz).

 

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On August 30th, Canada’s Ann Marie Lake produced a potential All-Tackle Length record brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) for American angler Michael J. Sadar, who hooked the fish while casting a mouse pattern fly. After a 10 minute fight, Sadar successfully landed, measured and released the beautiful 58 cm brooky, which bests the current record of 55 cm.

 

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Saltwater

 

As seasonal cold fronts move across the US, anglers from around the world travel to coastal Louisiana to target the numerous red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) that congregate on the inshore flats. On October 24th, angler Christine M. Helms of the Florida Keys landed a 11.11 kg (24 lb 8 oz) redfish while fishing with her husband Capt. Brian Helms out of Grand Isle, Louisiana. Helms needed 30 minutes to land the potential women’s 2 kg (4 lb) tippet class record, after it ate the glitterbug fly she was casting. The fish was released alive after being properly documented, and is one pound heavier than the current IGFA record.

 

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Angler Doug Borries of Ocean Springs, Mississippi, USA, bested an enormous 12.05 kg (26 lb 9 oz) red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) on fly while casting a Puglisi squid pattern on October 13th with Capt. Robert McDaniel. Once hooked up, Borries needed 15 minutes to pull the fish from the northern Gulf of Mexico. If approved, Borries’ fish would easily become the men’s 8 kg (16 lb) tippet class record and the heaviest red snapper caught on fly rod ever submitted to the IGFA. The current IGFA record is 7.43 kg (12 lb 6 oz).

 

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Aussie angler Candace Williams landed the potential new women’s 3 kg (6 lb) line class record golden trevally (Gnathanodon speciosus) while fishing out of Dampier, Australia on September 12th. Williams needed 35 minutes to subdue the 9.22 kg (20 lb 5 oz) brute, after it engulfed a live mullet she was using for bait. The current IGFA record stands at 6.6 kg (14 lb 8 oz).

 

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While fishing with Capt. Tom Robinson out of his home town of Naples, FL, USA on November 21st, Dr. Jan Forszpaniak caught and released an impressive 58 cm grey snapper (Lutjanus griseus), that could potentially beat the current All-Tackle Length record of 53 cm, which he set earlier in the year. Forszpaniak’s fish ate a threadfin herring and put up a spirited two minute fight before it was boated, measured, and released alive – something that is tough to do on a tasty fish like grey snapper!

 

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While trolling off the island of Tonga on October 31st, Kiwi angler Guy Jacobsen accomplished the seemingly impossible by catching a 16.33 kg (36 lb 0 oz) wahoo (Acanthocybium solandri) on only 1 kg (2 lb) tackle! This potential men’s 1 kg (2 lb) line class record, which exceeds the existing claim by more than 15 kg (30 lb), hit a lipless Halco lure and put up a 14 minute fight before it was subdued. Congratulations to Guy Jacobsen, Capt. John Batterton and the crew of the Hookin’ Bull on a great catch!

 

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SLAM & TROPHY CLUB

 

Inshore Super Grand Slam Club

 

On November 11th, Italian angler Fiorenzo Rasparini accomplished an Inshore Super Grand Slam while fishing Ascension Bay, Mexico with guide Julio Octavio Gamboa. Armed with nothing more than an Orvis fly rod, reel, and some hand tied flies, Rasparini caught a bonefish, permit, snook, and tarpon in a single day – something that very few anglers have ever accomplished.

 

 

 

Fishing for trophies and records is a challenge for any angler, but this month’s IGFA Hot Catches update covers one of the most impressive achievements we’ve ever received. In addition to potential world record carp caught in Japan and South Korea and a tropical gar caught in Costa Rica, the November Freshwater IGFA report includes the announcement of the fastest Trout Royal Slam ever achieved – and done so by a woman who is legally blind.

 

Freshwater

 

Japanese angler Hiroko Fuwa caught a 13.1 kg (28 lb 14 oz) common carp (Cyprinus carpio) while fishing Japan’s Lake Shoji on August 28th that may land her the new Female Junior record. Fuwa was fishing with a bread bait and needed 10 minutes to land her potential record carp, which was released alive after it was properly documented. The current IGFA record is 7.37 kg (16 lb 4 oz).

 

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While casting a Mepps Spinner in Costa Rica’s Rio Frio on November 7, 2012, native Costa Rican angler Mauricio Solis Salas landed a 8.64 kg (19 lb 0 oz) tropical gar (Atractosteus tropicus) that could earn him the new All-Tackle record. Salas was fishing with local guide Francisco Mejias Naranjo and needed 15 minutes to land the toothy fish after hooking up. The current IGFA record is 5.18 kg (11 lb 6 oz).  

 

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Angler Phillip W. Richmond, Jr., who is currently stationed in South Korea with the US Navy, has been exploring the different fishing opportunities in his temporary home. While fishing the NakDong River from his kayak on October 4th, Richmond landed a 4.6 kg (10 lb 2 oz) predatory carp (Chanodichthys erythropterus) while casting a swimbait into the chilly waters. Richmond needed five minutes to subdue the potential All-Tackle record fish, which has never before been submitted to the IGFA.

 

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Trout Royal Slam


Australian angler Cynthia Stevens is the IGFA’s newest member of the Trout Royal Slam, which she completed in an incredible 15 days during a whirlwind trip through North America. Not only did Cynthia complete her Royal Slam faster than anyone in IGFA history, she did it without the use of her eyes, as Cynthia is legally blind.

 

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Her quest began on September 15th when she caught a brook trout in New Hampshire while fishing with Rick Holloran. Ten days later, and on the other side of the country, Cynthia caught her golden, rainbow, and brown while fishing the San Joaquin and Owens Rivers in California. After only two days of rest, Cynthia then traveled north to Oregon where she caught her lake, bull, and cutthroat over three consecutive days, while fishing Odell Lake, the Cougar Reservoir, and the Williamette River, respectively.

 

Given Cynthia’s passion for angling, her extreme determination, and her goal-oriented personality, the IGFA’s Royal Slams were a perfect fit. And although Cynthia accomplished her slam in record time, it was anything but easy. Because all IGFA Slam & Trophy Clubs must be caught by IGFA rules, Cynthia made sure she was completely unassisted in all of her seven captures – something she had to reinforce with the helpful guides, all of whom provided testimony to the legitimacy of Cynthia’s captures. Enthused and invigorated by her success, Cynthia is planning to tackle more IGFA Royal Slams, explaining that they “allow anglers of all abilities to achieve something extraordinary in their passion of fishing.”

 

IGFA Announces 2014 Conservation Award Winners

Sportsmanship and conservation go hand in hand – anglers who hope for more and bigger fish tomorrow invariably understand the need to release catches they make today. Since 1993, the International Game Fish Association (IGFA) has been recognizing superlative achievements in fishing conservation with the annual IGFA Conservation Awards, bestowed upon honorees at the yearly IGFA International Auction & Banquet. This year the organization will give Conservation Awards in three categories at the event on January 31, 2014 at their headquarters in Dania Beach, Florida, USA:

IGFA Representative Award Winner:  Dr. Ken Neill III of Virginia, USA

With the family, friends, and crew who fish with him aboard Healthy Grin, Dr. Neill has contributed to a number of tagging studies and sample collection efforts.  Of the dozens of projects Healthy Grin has been thanked for contributing to, Neill reports that some of the most rewarding are the few that have led directly to fishery management decisions. “By capturing young-of the-year bluefin tuna and collecting tissue samples from bluefin tuna of all sizes, as well as participating in a variety of bluefin tagging projects,” Neill reports, “we have helped scientists better understand the relationships between the western and eastern stocks of Atlantic bluefin tuna. This information is now being used in international management decisions.”

Organization Award Winner: Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute in California, USA

Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute (HSWRI), an independent non-profit 501(c)(3) organization in southern California, USA, officially celebrated 50 years of its mission "to return to the sea some measure of the benefits derived from it" on June 3, 2013. To this end it is fitting that just two months later, in August, HSWRI released its two millionth white seabass – a testament to the success of their vision and the support of the California recreational angling community.

Industry Award Winner: King Sailfish Mounts in Florida, USA

In the early 1990's, King Sailfish Mounts introduced and began promoting the Release Mount Concept for Atlantic Sailfish. The International Game Fish Association and others assisted KSM in creating awareness among conservation-minded trophy-seeking anglers, and the Release Mount concept quickly gained momentum as an alternative to traditional sailfish taxidermy. King Sailfish Mounts generously donates mounts to a number of angling conservation organizations and has been credited for being the most influential producer of Release Mounts in the Taxidermy Industry.

“Each of this year’s honorees has made significant strides in research and conservation awareness,” said IGFA President Rob Kramer. “We are proud to recognize the hard work they have done to support a bright future for game fish.”

Anglers and conservationists are invited to join the IGFA in celebrating these achievements at the 30th Annual International Auction & Banquet this January. To reserve seats, visit http://www.igfa.org/Events/30th-Annual-International-Auction.aspx or contact Julia Shafer at jshafer@igfa.org or 954-924-4222.

 

 

 

IGFA HOT NEWS

 

Three new contenders for freshwater record titles have captured our attention for the October edition of IGFA Hot Catches. Hailing from waters in Italy, Papua New Guinea and Slovenia, anglers are waiting to find out whether the bar will be set just a little higher for grayling, northern pike, and Papuan black snapper once the IGFA has finished reviewing the applications.

 

Even more international catches are competing for saltwater world record titles this month at the IGFA. Atlantic blue marlin, bonefish, cubera snapper, golden trevally, and more caught in Angola, Australia, the Azores, France, New Zealand, New Caledonia, and California, Maryland, and New Jersey in the United States – including two Smallfry and two Junior potential world record catches – are now undergoing review.

 

FRESHWATER

 

Aussie angler Ian Middleton already holds several line class records for Papuan black snapper (Lutjanus goldiei), and after a recent trip to Papua New Guinea, he may have claimed another. While fishing with local guide Barly Kelai on August 17th, Middleton tamed a 9.98 kg (22 lb 0 oz) black snapper on only 2 kg (4 lb) tackle! The fish hit a Sebile lure that Middleton was casting and it took him nearly 30 minutes to subdue the potential men’s 2 kg (4 lb) line class record. The current IGFA record is vacant – a testament to how difficult it is to land these fish on light tackle.

 

Middleton Papuan black snapper 2.jpg

 

Italian angler Ivan Previcini landed an enormous 16.42 kg (36 lb 3 oz) northern pike (Esox lucius) on July 9th while fishing Italy’s Roncone Lake. Previcini was casting a Salmo Slider from the shore when he hooked up to his potential new 15 kg (30 lb) line class record pike. After a tough 10 minute fight, Previcini had the fish subdued and knew it was something special, as the current record stands at 15.64 kg (34 lb 8 oz).

 

Previcini northern pike 2.jpg

 

During a recent trip to Slovenia, American angler Christian Anderson landed a potential new All-Tackle Length record grayling (Thymallus thymallus) while fishing the Soca River on August 7th. Anderson was fly fishing with a small ant patterned dry fly and needed three minutes to subdue the 39 cm fish – only the second record submission from Slovenia - that was released alive after being properly documented. The current IGFA record is vacant.

 

Anderson grayling 2.jpg

 

SALTWATER

 

Angler Joanne Tatham from Western Australia caught a thick 7.4 kg (16 lb 5 oz) golden trevally (Gnathanodon speciosus) on 1 kg (2 lb) tackle while fishing Australia’s Dampier Archipelago on August 3rd. Tatham was fishing with her husband, Steve Tatham, and needed 25 minutes to subdue her potential 1 kg (2 lb) women’s line class record after it ate the live bait she was fishing. The current IGFA record is 6.3 kg (13 lb 14 oz).

 

 

Tatham golden trevally 2.jpg

 

Ana Campos recently traveled from her home in the UK to experience some of the amazing fishing in Angola on Africa’s south west coast. While trolling a Storm Thunder lure in Luanda on August 11th, Campos hooked into an impressive 14.9 kg (32 lb 13 0z) African red snapper (Lutjanus agennes) that took her 20 tough minutes to subdue. With the existing record at 9.2 kg (20 lb 4 oz), Campos’ fish qualifies her for the potential new women’s 15 kg (30 lb) line class record.

 

Campos African red snapper 2.jpg

 

IGFA Representative Dr. Iain Nicholson landed a 9 kg (19 lb 13 oz) giant African threadfin (Polydactylus quadrifilis) on June 22nd using only 1 kg (2 lb) tackle. Nicholson, a UK native, was fishing Barra do Kwanza, Angola, and used a live crab to entice the bite from the potential men’s 1 kg (2 lb) record fish – a record title which is currently vacant. 

 

Nicholson African threadfin 2.jpg

 

Junior angler John Andrew Aramendia, of New Braunfels, Texas, needed five hours to land a massive 95.71 kg (211 lb 0 oz) Atlantic bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus) after he hooked the fish on only 15 kg (30 lb) tackle. Aramendia was fishing out of Ocean City, Maryland with Capt. Brad Durkin when his potential male Junior record bigeye exploded on the ballyhoo intended for a billfish.  With the existing record at 84.82 kg (187 lb 0 oz), Aramendia’s fish will easily earn him the new record if approved.

 

Aramendia Atlantic bigeye tuna.jpg

 

While fishing out of Key West on July 20th with her uncle, Capt. Brian Bennett, angler Brielle Bennett landed a cubera snapper (Lutjanus cyanopterus) that tipped the scales at 19.28 kg (42 lb 8 oz). Brielle, an experienced young angler, needed 30 minutes to best the potential female Junior record after it ate the bonito chunk she was soaking. The current IGFA record is 8.82 kg (19 lb 7 oz).

 

Bennett cubera snapper.jpg

 

Smallfry Kiwi angler Ethan Owen Jones landed a 31.6 kg (69 lb 10 oz) southern yellowtail (Seriola lalandi) on July 29th while fishing off Mayor Island, New Zealand, with his father Chris Jones at the helm. The young angler needed 20 minutes to land his potential male Smallfry record after the fish exploded on the Boiye Pink Pusher lure he was trolling. The existing record is 21 kg (46 lb 4 oz).

 

Jones southern yellowtail.jpg

 

Aussie angler Dr. Gary Justin Post recently put New Caledonia “on the map” for every inshore angler in search of trophy bonefish (Albula spp.) after  landing an incredible 7.48 kg (16 lb 8 oz) bone on July 19th while fishing Boat Pass Flats. After taking a well presented Crazy Charlie fly, Post’s fish put up an amazing 45 minute fight before it was landed, properly documented, and released alive. With the existing men’s 8 kg (16 lb) tippet class record standing at 6.97 kg (15 lb 6 oz), Post’s fish easily qualifies for the potential new record in this tippet class.

 

 

Post bonefish 2.jpg

 

While fishing out of Mission Beach, California on August 25th, native California angler Kale’a Woodard landed a quality California halibut (Paralichthys californicus) that tipped the scales at 16.22 kg (35 lb 12 oz). Woodard, age 10, needed only four minutes to land her potential Female Smallfry record after it ate the live squid she was fishing. The current IGFA record is 7.66 kg (16 lb 14 oz).

 

Woodard California halibut 2.jpg

 

French angler Guillaume Fourrier was light-tackle fishing off Dieppe, France with local guide Emilie Couvreur on August 2nd when he hooked into a nice European bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Nearly 20 minutes after the bass ate the Madness Shad lure he was casting, Fourrier had his potential men’s 2 kg (4 lb) line class record subdued. The existing IGFA record is 5.99 kg (13 lb 3 oz).  

 

 

Fourrier European bass 2.jpg

 

 

Angler Sherrell Carter of Duluth, Georgia, bested the women’s 8 kg (16 lb) line class record for Atlantic blue marlin (Makaira nigricans) after landing a 241.8 kg (533 lb 1 oz) blue on August 26th. Carter, an experienced light tackle angler, was fishing the Condor Bank in the Azores with Capt. Olaf Grimkowski when the fish showed up in the spread. After pitching a live mackerel and coming tight on the fish, Carter needed only 17 minutes to subdue her massive marlin. With the existing record at 166.47 kg (367 lb 0 oz), Carter’s catch would easily replace this record that has stood since 1997, if it is approved.

 

 

Carter Atlantic blue marlin.jpg

 

 

Angler Joan M. Sharrott, of Staten Island, New York recently traveled to Shrewsbury, New Jersey to target the variety of near shore species with Capt. Dale Beacham. On September 19th, while casting a clouser fly, Sharrott hooked up to bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) that tipped the scales at 7.48 kg (16 lb 8 oz), after a 20 minute fight. Sharrott’s catch qualifies her for the potential new women’s 6 kg (12 lb) tippet class record, which currently stands at 5.44 kg (12 lb 0 oz).

 

 

 

Sharrott bluefish 2.jpg

 

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Octubre 2013

 

Billfish Conservation Act Closer to Complete Ban on US Mainland Billfish Sales

 

When the Billfish Conservation Act (BCA) was signed into US law nearly a year ago, conservationists worldwide cheered that the globe’s largest market for imported marlin, sailfish, and spearfish would soon be closed. Although the challenge of getting a bill passed through the legislative process was won, there is still work to be done to make sure the BCA will be properly enacted. Last Thursday, on September 26, 2013, the International Game Fish Association (IGFA) and Wild Oceans (formerly National Coalition for Marine Conservation) met with NOAA Fisheries senior staff to discuss progress on implementing the new law and learned that a complete ban on the sale of billfish in the mainland United States is nearing reality. 

 

The BCA, signed into law by President Obama on October 5, 2012, prohibits the sale of all marlin, sailfish, and spearfish in the continental US, effectively eliminating an estimated 30,000 billfish being imported each year from foreign countries.  In April of this year, NOAA Fisheries announced an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPR) seeking comment on implementing and enforcing the Act.  Of particular concern is whether or not billfish harvested in Hawaii and nearby US territories under an exemption for traditional Pacific island fisheries may be shipped to the mainland. 

 

When IGFA and Wild Oceans, through their joint Take Marlin Off the Menu campaign, facilitated the creation of the Act in 2011, the intent was to completely close the mainland to importation and sale of all billfish, thus ending a sizeable foreign market, while still allowing the traditional local consumption of billfish in the Hawaiian Islands.  After the BCA was signed into law, both groups immediately began working with legal and trade experts to emphasize the law’s intent to NOAA Fisheries as the BCA entered the rule-making process.  During the ANPR comment period, IGFA and Wild Oceans submitted detailed comments that highlighted the following key items:

·         The BCA was intended as a mechanism to conserve imperiled billfish and not to replace foreign origin billfish in the mainland US with fish caught under the domestic exemption

·         Allowing billfish harvested in Hawaii to be shipped and sold to the mainland US, where imports are prohibited, would violate international trade law

·         Sale of Hawaii-caught billfish in the US mainland would necessitate a new and complex layer of monitoring and enforcement and facilitate a black market for illegal imports.

 

(For full comments see http://wildoceans.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/WO-Comments-on-BCA-ANPR-7-3-13.pdf

 and http://www.igfa.org/images/uploads/files/IGFA BCA ANPRM Comments (FINAL).pdf.)

 

During their meeting with NOAA Fisheries staff, IGFA Conservation Director Jason Schratwieser and Wild Oceans President Ken Hinman were told that, since it was signed into law last fall, NOAA Fisheries has been interpreting the BCA as a complete prohibition on possession and sale of billfish covered by the Act in the continental United States and will continue to do so until it issues a Final Rule.  To underscore this policy, NOAA has issued an enforcement order that existing billfish product on the mainland be destroyed or donated to charity. 

 

NOAA Fisheries staff said they intend to issue a proposed rule by the end of this year or early 2014.  IGFA and Wild Oceans will continue to work with the agency to ensure that the conservation goals of the BCA are maintained throughout the rulemaking process and the strictest interpretation of the law is implemented.

For more information on the Take Marlin Off the Menu campaign and the Billfish Conservation Act, including the research behind the movement, please visit http://www.igfa.org/Conserve/Billfish-Conservation-Act.aspx or http://wildoceans.org/the-public-weights-in-strictly-enforce-the-billfish-conservation-act/

 

Founded in 1939, the IGFA is a non-profit organized under Section 501(c)(3) under the Internal Revenue Code and is  best known for conservation efforts of fisheries, educational programs, rule-making and for maintaining worldwide game fish records in freshwater, saltwater, fly fishing and junior angler categories. IGFA members are located in over 125 countries. The IGFA welcomes visitors to its 60,000-square-foot interactive Fishing Hall of Fame & Museum in Dania Beach, Florida.

 

For further information, contact the IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame & Museum, 300 Gulf Stream Way, Dania Beach, Florida 33004; phone 954-927-2628, fax: 954-924-4299, website: www.igfa.org.   

 

Wild Oceans, formerly the National Coalition for Marine Conservation or NCMC, was founded by anglers in 1973. Our mission is to preserve fishing opportunities for the future by bringing conservation-minded fishermen and pro-fishing environmentalists together to promote a broad, ecosystems approach to fisheries management that reflects our expanding circle of concern for all marine life and the future of fishing.  www.wildoceans.org

 

 

 

 

IGFA Hot Catches

 

September 2013

 

Trout is the fish of the month in the freshwater world! September brought world record applications for bull trout and Arctic char, as well as an application for the coveted Royal Trout Slam Club, to the International Game Fish Association. Check out these contenders as well as new zander and smallmouth bass challengers from Canada, Finland, Japan, and the USA in this month’s Hot Catches update of potential new world records.

 

Although an Atlantic halibut from Norway recently made headlines worldwide, the catch has not yet been received by the IGFA for world record consideration; however, a sizeable California halibut is now before the World Records committee for a potential 6 kg (12 lb) line class record. Read on for this catch, plus potential Pacific bluefin tuna, bluefish, and yellowmargin triggerfish world records from Baja, Christmas Island, and California and New Jersey in the United States – as well as a new Inshore Grand Slam with a tarpon, permit, and bonefish out of Cayo Cruz, Cuba!

 

Freshwater

 

Jim Sollecito of Syracuse, New York, USA, recently targeted trophy class Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) in areas of the northern Canadian wilderness so remote they could only be accessed by helicopter and air plane. On August 8th, while fishing Newfoundland’s Tasiuyak Lake, Sollecito landed a beautiful 7.94 kg (17 lb 8 oz) Arctic char while casting a muddler minnow in the crystal clear water. Nearly 20 minutes after hooking up, Sollecito finally landed a potential 6 kg (12 lb) tippet class record char that eclipses the existing record by 8 oz.

 

Sollecito Arctic char.jpg

 

Finnish angler Jasmin Vataja landed a potential 1 kg (2 lb) line class record zander (Sander lucioperca) on July 19th while fishing with local guide Kari Hokkanen in Airisto, Finland. Vataja was trolling a Rapala Scatter Rap plug and skillfully played the fish for 22 minutes before bringing it boatside. Weighing in at 1.72 kg (3 lb 12 oz), Vataja’s zander exceeds the current record by two pounds.   

 

Vataja zander.jpg

 

While fishing Lake Inawashiro in his home waters of Japan on June 8th, Dr. Ichiro Nagai caught an impressive 2.55 kg (5 lb 9 oz) smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) while fly casting with guide Hiroyuki Motoyama. A well placed Iwa Minnow fly enticed the bite and 10 minutes later Nagai had the potential 4 kg (8 lb) tippet class record fish boated. After properly documenting the fish on a nearby shore, Nagai released the bass alive to grow even bigger. The current IGFA record is 2.38 kg (5 lb 4 oz).

 

Nagai smallmouth bass.jpg

 

IGFA Trustee Gary A. Carter of Duluth, Georgia, USA has achieved multiple world records on some of the ocean’s most challenging fish, but until recently Carter’s record fishing had been limited to saltwater species. However, while fishing outside of Fernie, Canada on August 18th, Carter landed a 6.8 kg (14 lb 15 oz) bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) that could potentially earn him the new 4 kg (8 lb) line class record. Carter, an experienced light tackle angler, needed 15 minutes to land the trout after it took a white bucktail jig he was casting. After being properly documented and weighed, Carter released the fish back into Lodgepole Creek. The current IGFA record is 6.12 kg (13 lb 8 oz).

 

Carter bull trout.jpg

 

Trout Royal Slam

On August 15th, Michael Yannick became the newest member of the IGFA’s prestigious Trout Royal Slam Club by landing a golden trout while fishing California’s appropriately named Fish Creek. Yannick’s quest began on July 17, 2008 when he landed a rainbow trout while fishing in Alaska’s Kenai River. Shortly after that, Yannick landed his lake trout while fishing Lake George, New York. After a three year hiatus, Yannick traveled to Alberta, Canada where he picked up his cutthroat and bull trout in July of 2011. A resident of Pennsylvania, Yannick was able to catch his brown and brook trout in the waters of his home state in late 2011 and the spring of 2012. The IGFA congratulates Michael Yannick on his angling achievements and welcomes him to the Trout Royal Slam Club.

 

 

Saltwater

 

Angler Vick Sommers was fishing his home waters of Southern California, USA on July 30th when he landed a 24.15 kg (53 lb 4 oz) California halibut (Paralichthys californicus) while soaking squid on the bottom. Using light tackle, Sommers needed 30 minutes to subdue the potential men’s 6 kg (12 lb) line class record halibut. The current IGFA record stands at 23.81 kg (52 lb 8 oz).

 

Sommers California halibut.jpg

 

Anglers fishing off the coasts of Southern California and Mexico’s Baja Peninsula have reported strong numbers of Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis) this season, a change from the past few years. While aboard a long range boat from Southern California, angler Colin R. Waters landed a potential men’s 10 kg (20 lb) tippet class record Pacific bluefin tuna while fishing off the Baja coast on August 1st. After coming tight on the 7.26 kg (16 lb 0 oz) tuna, Waters needed only 10 minutes to subdue his catch. The current IGFA record is vacant.

 

Waters Pacific bluefin tuna.jpg

 

Angler Wade Boggs of Tampa, Florida landed a potential All-Tackle Length record bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) on July 19th while fishing with Capt. Frank Crescitelli off Shrensbury Rocks, New Jersey. Boggs needed only eight minutes to subdue the 87 cm fish after it crushed the live bait he was fishing. Once boated, the fish was quickly measured and photographed before being released alive. The current IGFA record is 82 cm.  

 

Boggs bluefish.jpg

 

While visiting the beautiful and remote Christmas Island in the Pacific Ocean, Singaporean angler Kelvin Ng landed a potential All-Tackle record yellowmargin triggerfish (Pseudobalistes flavimarginatus) while fly fishing on August 8th. The beautiful triggerfish weighed in at 3.5 kg (7 lb 11 oz) after an intense five minute fight across the pristine flats, and was released alive after being properly documented. The current IGFA record is 2.75 kg (6 lb 1 oz).

 

Ng-yellowmargin-triggerfish.jpg

 

Inshore Grand Slam

Italian angler Paolo Fornasari accomplished his third Inshore Grand Slam on April 28th while fishing the pristine inshore waters surrounding Cayo Cruz, Cuba. With local guide Nelson on the poling platform, Fornasari successfully landed an estimated 36.3 kg (80 lb) tarpon, a 7.7 kg (17 lb) permit and a 2 kg (4 lb) bonefish – all on fly rod! Congratulations Paolo, on a great achievement and another Inshore Grand Slam!

 

 

IGFA WRGF 2013 Front Cover.jpg

 

Since the first annual IGFA World Record Game Fishes book appeared in 1971, the publication has had a legacy as one of the most reliable and complete sources of international fishing records and related reference materials. The 2013 edition has just been released this January and continues the tradition of inspiring awe, appreciation, and an ethical approach to sportfishing with the selection of Marc Montocchio’s marlin photograph for the cover. Montocchio specializes in capturing images and video of unhooked, free-swimming game fish. His focus on the health and conservation of some of the ocean’s most majestic species speaks to the IGFA’s mission and goals in 2013.

With seven articles on topics ranging from bluewater quarry and salmon streams to hero shot techniques and tackle history, the annual publication also brings sportsmen the most anticipated feature of the book – the yearly recount of angling records for every sportfish species around the globe. Please find the full press release attached, along with the cover of the 2013 edition of IGFA World Record Game Fishes. If I can send you anything else, please don’t hesitate to let me know.

 

 

Brook record

 

Not New but interesting... This Brook Trout Caught in Manitoba, Canada measured 29 inches with a girth of 21 inches, Near 17 lbs & Could have potentially broke the world record set in 1916 of 14.8 lbs - But this Angler Released his Proud Catch with No Official Measurements. Either way a Beautiful Fish & a Great Day Fishing! Details here -

This story has been bouncing around the Web for a while, but here’s an excerpt from the latest press release recently sent to us by out friends at Anglingmasters.com:

Angling Masters International and "The Fish'n Line" magazine today announced that a potential world-record 29-inch brook trout was caught during the inaugural four-week "Fish'n Win" tournament.

During the October tournament, Tim Matheson of Manitoba, Canada apparently broke a 90-year-old world record by landing a brook trout that measured 29 inches in length with a girth of 21 inches. After measuring and photographing the fish, Matheson and his fishing buddy released it back into Manitoba's Barbe Lake.

"Based on the measurements of the fish and the pictures I've seen, I'd estimate Matheson's brook trout to be between 15 and 17 pounds," said Rob Cann, Angling Program Manager at Canada's provincial Water Stewardship Fisheries Branch. The International Game Fish Association's current world record for brook trout is 14 pounds 8 ounces and was caught in July 1916.

According to Matheson, matching the requirements for IGFA world record consideration would likely have led to the death of the massive brook trout. As a catch-and-release fisherman, Matheson says such an outcome was never a consideration in his mind.

 

 

 

Octubre 2012

 

Carter dolphinfish.jpg

 

 

 

The end of the year is just around the corner, and world record-seeking anglers have their eye on the 2013 IGFA World Record Game Fishes book. Some of the record hopefuls that have submitted applications to the IGFA this month may see their name in the next edition of the annual publication, but because the cut-off date for the annual world record cycle is August 15th for catches made in the United States and July 15th for catches made internationally, many will be hoping their potential records, if approved, will stand until the 2014 book.

 

Whether or not every fish in this month’s IGFA Hot Catches report – from as far afield as Australia, Canada, Ghana, Panama, Papua New Guinea and Alaska, Florida, and New Jersey in the United States – makes it into the IGFA World Record Game Fishes book, these anglers still have something to brag about – check out these catches!

 

One such catch belongs to a familiar name in the World Record book. Angler Sherrell Carter of Duluth, Georgia, USA, has held the women’s 2 kg (4 lb) line class record for dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) since 2009. Carter decided to try her luck with 1 kg (2 lb) line on August 25, 2012, when a big dolphin entered the spread off Piñas Bay, Panama. Under the guidance of Capt. Yoan Alcala, Carter pitched a ballyhoo to the dorado and was instantly hooked up. After a quick five minute fight, the gaffs were sunk and the fish was boated. Back at the docks, the fish tipped the scales at 20.35 kg (44 lb 1 oz), qualifying Carter for the potential women’s 1 kg (2 lb) line class record. The current IGFA record is 18.37 kg (40 lb 8 oz).

 

 

The end of the year is just around the corner, and world record-seeking anglers have their eye on the 2013 IGFA World Record Game Fishes book. Some of the record hopefuls that have submitted applications to the IGFA this month may see their name in the next edition of the annual publication, but because the cut-off date for the annual world record cycle is August 15th for catches made in the United States and July 15th for catches made internationally, many will be hoping their potential records, if approved, will stand until the 2014 book.

 

Whether or not every fish in this month’s IGFA Hot Catches report – from as far afield as Australia, Canada, Ghana, Panama, Papua New Guinea and Alaska, Florida, and New Jersey in the United States – makes it into the IGFA World Record Game Fishes book, these anglers still have something to brag about – check out these catches!

 

Angler Angelo Ruvio of North Haledon, New Jersey, USA landed a massive great northern tilefish (Lopholatilus chamaeleonticeps) while fishing Poorman’s Canyon off the coast of New Jersey on August 8, 2012. Ruvio was fishing with Capt. Jason Kim and needed 10 minutes to boat the fish after it hit the squid he was soaking on the bottom. Tipping the scales at 29.57 kg (65 lb 3 oz), Ruvio’s catch qualifies him for the potential All-Tackle record. The current IGFA record stands at 28.8 kg (63 lb 8 oz). 

 

Aussie angler Steve Starling was fly fishing in Australia’s Darwin Harbour on June 17, 2012 when a 16 kg (35 lb 4 oz) talang queenfish (Scomberoides commersonianus) exploded on the clouser he was casting. After a brutal 35 minute fight, Starling had the fish boated and was headed back to the docks with his potential men’s 10 kg (20 lb) tippet class record. The current IGFA record is 9.45 kg (20 lb 13 oz).

 

Angler Dr. Mark Hatton recently traveled from his home in West Milford, New Jersey, USA to Canada’s Northwest Territories to target the variety of freshwater species the area has to offer. While fly casting a pink fly in the Nanook River on July 30, 2012, Hatton came tight with a beautiful Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus). After a 30 minute fight, Dr. Hatton boated and quickly released the fish after taking the necessary photos and measurements. Taping out to 86 cm on his Official IGFA Measuring Device, Hatton’s char qualifies for the new potential All-Tackle Length record, as the category is currently vacant.

 

Papua New Guinea is a small island nation that is home to some very big fish, as native angler Jason N. Yip knows very well. Fishing the Kumimaipa River on July 30, 2012, Yip hooked into a monster of a Papuan black snapper (Lutjanus goldiei) that tipped the scales at 20.87 kg (46 lb). Yip’s potential All-Tackle record ate a Rapala Shad Rap lure and fought for 10 minutes before it was landed. After taking the necessary photos and measurements, Yip released the fish alive to grow even bigger.  The current IGFA record is 19.2 kg (42 lb 5 oz). 

 

Angler Bob Gaines spent time this summer away from his California home to target freshwater species in Alaska’s Kenai River. While fly casting the Kenai on August 23, 2012, Gaines hooked into a beautiful pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) after it hit his pink polar shrimp fly. Ten minutes later, Gaines landed the fish and took the necessary photos and measurements before releasing it alive. Measuring out to 67 cm, Gaines’ fish qualifies him for the potential new All-Tackle Length record. The current IGFA record stands at 65 cm.

 

Angler Sherrell Carter of Duluth, Georgia, USA, has held the women’s 2 kg (4 lb) line class record for dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) since 2009. Carter decided to try her luck with 1 kg (2 lb) line on August 25, 2012, when a big dolphin entered the spread off Piñas Bay, Panama. Under the guidance of Capt. Yoan Alcala, Carter pitched a ballyhoo to the dorado and was instantly hooked up. After a quick five minute fight, the gaffs were sunk and the fish was boated. Back at the docks, the fish tipped the scales at 20.35 kg (44 lb 1 oz), qualifying Carter for the potential women’s 1 kg (2 lb) line class record. The current IGFA record is 18.37 kg (40 lb 8 oz).

 

Aussie angler Peter Morse took advantage of the southern bluefin tuna (Thunnus maccoyii) bite off Narooma, Australia this past season, landing an 18.5 kg (40 lb 12 oz) fish on fly while fishing with Capt. Benn Boulton on June 26, 2012. The tuna ate a deceiver fly and put up a strong 13 minute fight before being landed. Morse’s fish qualifies him for the men’s 8 kg (16 lb) tippet class record, which currently stands at 9.8 kg (21 lb 9 oz).

 

Dr. Martin Arostegui, IGFA Trustee and Lifetime Achiever, recently made the best of the hot summer cubera snapper (Lutjanus cyanopterus) bite in his backyard of Miami, Florida, USA. While fishing with Capt. Bouncer Smith on August 31, 2012, Arostegui pulled up a 124 cm cubera after it crushed the lobster being used for bait and put up an exhausting 25 minute fight. Once the fish was boated, it was quickly measured, photographed, and released alive. This fish qualifies Arostegui for the potential new All-Tackle Length record, which is currently vacant for this species. 

 

Angler Marc Towers traveled to Ghana from his home in the United Kingdom to target some of the diverse freshwater species found in this country. On March 29, 2012, while casting a Mepps black flurry lure from the banks of Lake Volta, Towers hooked into something big. After a quick seven minute fight, Towers had landed a 12.93 kg (28 lb 9 oz) North African tigerfish (Hydrocynus brevis). This toothy critter qualifies Towers for the potential new All-Tackle record, which currently stands at 5.67 kg (12 lb 8 oz).

 


 

Standing records for swordfish, whiterock bass, largemouth bass, Atlantic halibut and more are being challenged in this month’s edition of the IGFA Hot Catches. This selection of the latest potential records from Australia, the Clipperton Atoll, Germany, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, and Florida and Nebraska in the United States is on its way to the IGFA Record Committee to see if they set a new bar for anglers around the world!

 

Nadeau whiterock bass.jpg

 

Swordfish (Xiphias gladius) are considered by many anglers to be among the toughest fighting gamefish in the sea, but that reputation did not deter female junior angler Jessie Wright. Fishing out of Garden Patch, New Zealand on April 9, 2012, the 16 year old angler landed a quality 165.2 kg (364 lb 3 oz) broadbill in just over four hours after it took the rigged squid they were drifting. This potential female junior record was landed on the Western Break, captained by Nathan Adams who also has a pending men’s 37 kg (80 lb) line class record for Pacific bluefin tuna. The current female Junior record stands at 81.5 kg (179 lb 10 oz) and was also caught in New Zealand.

 

South African angler Hennie Moller landed a sharptooth catfish (Clarias gariepinus) on April 17, 2012 while fishing Kakamas, South Africa. Tipping the scales at 18.26 kg (40 lb 4 oz), Moller’s fish qualifies for the new potential 24 kg (50 lb) line class record. After the catfish ate a live mudfish, this potential record catch was landed in 10 minutes and released alive after the necessary documentation was taken.  The current IGFA record is 15.1 kg (33 lb 4 oz).

 

Angler Matthew Nadeau of Lafayette, Colorado, USA landed a 5.36 kg (11 lb 12 oz) whiterock bass (Morone saxatilis x M. chrysops) on June 9, 2012 while fishing Lake McConaughy, Nebraska. Nadeau landed the fish in three minutes after it ate the streamer fly he was casting. If approved, Nadeau’s fish will replace the existing 8 kg (16 lb) tippet class record which stands at 4.98 kg (11 lb).

 

California native Kathleen J. Rounds recently traveled to the Clipperton Attoll to target the variety of game fish species found around this eastern Pacific Ocean island. While casting a Salas 7x spoon on April 13, 2012 with guide Jonathan Yamate, Rounds needed 20 minutes to land a bluefin trevally (Caranx melampygus) that tipped the scales at a whopping 13.24 kg (29 lb 3 oz), qualifying her for the potential All-Tackle record as well as the women’s 15 kg (30 lb) line class record. The current IGFA record is 11.99 kg (26 lb 7 oz).

 

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Angler Patrick Sebile was fishing with local guide Jeff Brooks on May 6, 2012 when he pulled a largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) from Lake Okeechobee, Florida, USA. Sebile landed the fish in a minute after it ate the Sebile Proppler Buzz lure he was casting. Sebile’s catch measured out to 61 cm and was released alive, qualifying him for the potential new All-Tackle Length record. The existing record stands at 59 cm.

 

German angler Rainer Korn, was fishing off of Skjerstadfjord, Norway on May 13, 2012 when he landed a 15.9 kg (35 lb) Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus). Korn was using a shad for bait and needed 15 minutes to boat the potential men’s 10 kg (20 lb) line class record. The current record stands at 6.04 kg (13 lb 5 oz).

 

Heather Michelle Harkavy is no stranger to the record books, and at age 17 she has accumulated nearly 100 records. Harvkavy’s recent 14.51 kg (32 lb ) permit (Trachinotus falcatus) could add to that total, as it qualifies for the potential Female Junior record. Harvkavy was fishing with Capt. Mike Holliday on June 8, 2012, and got the permit to eat a live crab. Fifteen minutes after Harvkavy boated the fish, she had obtained an accurate weight reading and released her catch alive. If approved, Harvkavy’s fish will best the existing record by 2 lb.

 

Aussie angler Cassandra Murphy was fishing with Jim Maguire out of Morten Island, Australia on June 19, 2012 when she landed an impressive longtail tuna (Thunnus tonggol). Using a slimy mackerel for bait, Murphy needed 40 minutes to land this potential All-Tackle Length fish that measured out to 110 cm. As with every All-Tackle Length record, this fish was released alive after the necessary documentation. This record is currently vacant.


 

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Catfish fans, take note: a 32 year old record, and the oldest current standing record for blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus), is being challenged! Two young female anglers are also making waves with potential records this month, along with catches from Argentina, Colombia, Mauritius, and the Florida Keys, North Carolina, and Tennessee in the United States. Read on for updates on the hottest record applications we have received at IGFA headquarters this month.

 

 

French angler Marie Edwige Madeleine Foret, recently traveled to the island of Mauritius to target some of the great pelagic species found along the island nation. The young angler was not disappointed as she landed a 9.5 kg (20 lb 15 oz) dogtooth tuna (Gymnosarda unicolor) while fishing with local guide Yann Colas on Feb. 15, 2012. Marie needed only 6 minutes to land this potential new Female Junior record after it nailed the Mann’s Magnum lure they were trolling. The current IGFA record, set in April 2004 in Rabaul, Papua New Guinea, is 2 kg (4 lb 6 oz).

 

 

IGFA Representative Peter F. Binaski of Costa Mesa, California, USA, landed a beautiful 7.7 kg (17 lb) dorado (Salminus brasiliensis) to qualify for the potential 4 kg (8 lb) tippet class record. Binaski, who currently holds this tippet-class record as well as the 3 kg (6 lb) and 6 kg (12 lb) records for the species, was fishing with local guide Elbio Bordon in Concordia, Argentina on Jan. 6, 2012 when his fish ate a well-presented deceiver fly. After a tense 17 minute fight, Binaski landed the fish and quickly released it after completing the necessary documentation. Binaski’s current IGFA record stands at 6.58 kg (14 lb 8 oz). 

 

 

 

Judging by this new record submission for bonnethead shark (Sphyrna tiburo), angler Dotty Ballantyne has been taking advantage of the rich fishing grounds in Key West. Fishing with local captain Doug Kilpatrick on Mar. 14, 2012, Dotty was able to coax a 4.2 kg (9 lb 4 oz) bonnethead to eat a custom baitfish fly. After a 10 minute fight over the flats, Ballantyne was able to successfully catch and release the new potential 3 kg (6 lb) tippet class record. If approved, this will be the 90th tippet-class record for the fly fishing aficionado, 27 of which have been for species of sharks. The current IGFA record is 3.18 kg (7 lb) and was set in McClellanville, South Carolina, USA late last year.

 

Angler Joshua D. Lee drove south from his hometown of Manassas, Virginia, USA to do some surf fishing on Ocracoke Island, North Carolina on Mar. 23, 2012. Soaking a fresh chunk of mullet, Lee was able to entice a hearty 110 cm red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) to bite. After fighting the fish for 13 minutes, Lee was able to land and properly document the fish before releasing it alive, potentially earning him a new All-Tackle Length record. The current IGFA record is 107 cm and was set on Fisherman’s Island, Chesapeake Bay, Virginia, USA, but seven line class records for this species have also been set along Lee’s hunting ground on Ocracoke.

 

 

 

 

 



 

Smallfry angler Brielle Bennett brought up a black grouper (Mycteroperca bonaci) while fishing off Key West, Florida, USA on Mar. 24, 2012 with her uncle, Captain Brian Bennett. The young angler, who took first place in the Female Smallfry division of world records last year, needed 10 minutes to land the 17.24 kg (38 lb) black after it ate the live goggle eye she had on the bottom. After bringing the fish aboard for a quick picture and documentation, this potential new Female Smallfry record – Bennett’s first of the year – was released to swim another day. Less than half the size of Bennett’s catch, the current IGFA record stands at 6.35 kg (14).

 

 

Angler Raymond Heredia Orosco of Highland, Indiana, USA, recently traveled to Colombia for a change of scenery and to do some freshwater fishing. Fishing in a private pond outside of Caicedonia, Colombia on Mar. 7, 2012, Raymond landed a huge tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) after it ate guayaba fruit, and took him for a 17 minute fight. Weighing a whopping 16.78 kg (37 lb) before it was released alive, Orosco’s fish easily qualifies for the potential new 3 kg (6 lb) line class record.  The current IGFA record was set nearly twelve years ago with a 9.97 kg (22 lb) catch made in the Teles Pires River in Brazil.

 

 

Angler Eric Maurer was fishing the Chickamauga Lake, Tennessee when he landed a potential 37 kg (80 lb) line class record for blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus) – a species for which he has already achieved five world records from the same location, but most on 60 kg (130 lb) line class. Maurer was fishing with cut skipjack herring on Mar. 15, 2012 when the 37.65 kg (83 lb) monster hit and after a 15 minute fight, Maurer had the fish subdued. He quickly took the necessary measurements and photos before releasing the fish alive. The current IGFA record stands at 36.28 kg (80 lb) and was set in 1980 – making it the oldest record still standing for the species

 

 

 

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